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High Street brand supports clothing charity

Selection of clothes available through dessability
Selection of clothes available through dessability Image credit: swindonadvertiser.co.uk

A local independent charity in Swindon has been supported by a national clothing firm so it can continue its work manufacturing garments for people with limited dexterity.

A local independent charity in Swindon has been supported by a national clothing firm so it can continue its work manufacturing garments for people with limited dexterity.

Staff at Dressability were given a boost by high street company FatFace allowing them to provide sample kits which can be showcased promoting their services for disabled customers.

Clothes donated by FatFace are tailored to suit people with disabilities wishing to stay fashionable through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Manager of Dressability, Sharon Tombs, told Swindon Advertiser: “Because of the Covid pandemic we can’t visit community groups and organisations who help people who have a disability, to show them what we can do.

“We’ve had to adapt our plans and I came up with the idea of making up kits to give to these organisations so that their own workers can showcase what we do for the people they help.

“For a local charity to have a national clothing company support us is just fantastic.”

The kits come with five or six items of adapted clothing such as invisible zips, Velcro back openings, magnetic buttons and trouser loops for people who struggle with buttoning, have difficulty lifting their arms or wish to carry medical equipment discreetly.

Tombs said: “If you’ve had a stroke, you probably still love the clothes you had before and don’t suddenly want to have to wear jogging bottoms all the time or whatever, if you haven’t before.

“The whole ethos of Dressibility is that you don’t need to buy specially adapted clothes. We will make your clothes work for you.”

FatFace has already donated enough clothes to fill 20 sample kits which are suitable to be delivered to stroke units, special education schools, care homes and other services for people with disabilities.

Tombs added: “The great thing about these clothes is that they’re colourful, fashionable, modern and they reflect the fact that people with disabilities don’t want to wear disabled clothes.

“People who have long term health conditions still want to pick clothes of their choice and wear things that represent who they are. And that’s what clothes do.

“These kits allow us to spread the word and help people who don’t know about us retain their dignity and independence.”

FatFace was founded in 1988 by Tim Slade and Jules Leaver as a business selling T-shirts at ski resorts.