Menu

Stonehenge

Stonehenge
Stonehenge Image credit: wikipedia.org

VENUE: Stonehenge, Salisbury

ADDRESS: Near Amesbury, Wiltshire, SP4 7DE

CONTACT: 0370 333 1181

ACCESS INFO

You are welcome to bring a companion if you need support during your visit.

Stonehenge provides accessible toilets and adult changing rooms, but please be aware there are no handrails.

Assistance dogs are welcome on-site and water is available for them on request.

The area around the car parks, visitor centre and the Stone Circle is accessible by wheelchair but please bear in mind the grass paths could become slippery in poor weather conditions.

The visitor shuttle bus is accessible which takes 10 minutes to reach the Stone Circle so there’s no need to book. You are welcome to hop off at the half-way point (Fargo Plantation) if you wish to walk the final part of the journey.

The wider landscape is not accessible to standard wheelchairs, but the there are two suitable wheelchairs available to hire for your visit which operate on a first come, first served basis.

There are 22 accessible parking bays available.

There’s no lift onsite, although on the plus side there’s no stairs.

You will find benches in the visitor centre, car parks and there is limited seating around the Stone Circle.

There is a flat tarmac and grassed path around the Stone Circle.

For visitors who have vision loss there are a number of tactile opportunities in the exhibition which has an area of low lighting.

Audio guides and large print editions of exhibition text/ orientation leaflets are available on request.

For visitors with hearing loss Induction Loops are available at the centre. All spoken audio exhibits in the exhibition have subtitles and BSL. The exhibition also offers Audio Installation Transcripts.

Exhibits have easy to read material to accommodate some visitors who have learning disabilities.

Please be aware all visits must be pre-booked through the Stonehenge website.

DID YOU KNOW?

The first stones are believed to have been raised at the site between 2400 and 2200 BC.

WEBSITE            

English Heritage website