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Fire expert joked about disabled people trapped in Grenfell Tower

Colin Todd
Colin Todd Image credit: dailymail.co.uk

A safety expert who provided evidence at the Grenfell Inquiry shared jokes about disabled people caught in the blaze.

Colin Todd has been caught out by Insider after it emerged the fire safety professional wrote a disgusting post in an online forum in 2014.

Todd wrote: 'What fun we will have watching RudeTube videos of the poor disabled people crawling on their hands and knees down smoke filled corridors when the common parts fire alarm system operates to tell them to get out into the corridors because there is smoke in them.'

'It all promotes equality, because the able bodied people will have to go on their hands and knees too when the smoke layer gets too low, rather than staying in the safety of their flats.'

Todd defended his comment saying it was wrote in a sarcastic tone in response to another post suggesting the block should had been equipped with extra fire alarms.

The remark Todd was referring to read: 'It’s important to tell people, who are unable to react, that they are in a burning building.

'We wouldn't want them to safely sleep through a fire in the building. Where's the fun in that?'

Todd’s company, C.S. Todd & Associates, came under scrutiny when they stated disabled residents do not require individual plans to escape fires in public housing.

The advice was published in 2011 and deleted ten years afterwards in 2021.

Todd was a witness at the Grenfell Inquiry which found his company’s ‘stay put’ advice for disabled people had failed.

According to Disability Rights UK 15 out of the 72 people who lost their lives in the 2017 fire had a disability.

Todd stood by the ‘stay put’ advice saying it was favourable to vulnerable people and acted with the principles of equality.

Grenfell Tower caught fire on 14 June 2017, 72 people died and more than 70 were injured.